Dr Mavaza CornerPolitics

President Mnangagwa did not reward POLAD but empowered spirit of development

BY Dr Masimba Mavaza

POLAD has been the power to peace in Zimbabwe after the 2018 elections. By giving them cars to enhance their work Mnangagwa did not seek to bribe but to empower those who love their country at any cost.

The Zimbabwe government realised that the basic human right it must deliver to its people was peace. Peace is a basic right it is the duty of every ruling party to maintain peace and order. It is that duty of the ruling party to deliver peace to its people.

A peaceful government reigns over a peaceful nation. Peace in a nation starts with a peaceful opposition. The opposition has a duty to accept defeat when it is defeated on the poll.

No modern presidential candidate has refused to concede. Here’s why that matters. The formal concession speech has played a vital role in even the most divisive elections in every democratic nation.

Zimbabwe has had problems with the opposition. Chamisa also has refused to commit to a peaceful transfer of power by refusing to accept defeat at the ballot box. Chamisa refused to concede even after all legal challenges were resolved. Zimbabwean history has seen a handful of bitterly contested elections, most recently in 2008 when Biti called on Mugabe to concede in the early hours after election night—only to call back back and retract his concession when the race unexpectedly tightened up.

No presidential candidate has ever refused to concede defeat once all the votes were counted and legal challenges resolved. But Chamisa has always been pulling a legitimate card despite losing both a ballot and legal battle.

For the country’s first thirty seven years or so, conceding a race wasn’t part of the process at all. Here’s how the loser’s concession went from nonexistent to an essential custom that all candidates have observed—albeit some less graciously than others. Concessions became an election tradition world wide.

The peaceful transfer of power has been a norm since 1980 when the country’s puppert prime minister Abel Muzorewa and president Gumede became the first to losers his reelection bid and quietly left the seat on an early morning stagecoach to avoid attending his successor Robert Mugabe inauguration.
Some early presidential candidates did send congratulatory letters to their opponent.

But none concessions didn’t become an election problem until 2002 when Tsvangirai who had won a referendum was defeated By Robert Mugabe in the presidential elections.

Tsvangirai learned that his loss was certain and immediately sent a letter to ZANU PF offering his congratulations and stating: “We have submitted the issue to the Zimbabwean people and their will is law.”

This exchange of messages was much commented upon at the time, but Tsvangirai was pushed by his sponsors and he retracted his message and claimed intimidation. With that mentality the opposition has graduated in refusing to accept defeat and cause havoc every time after their defeat. What the opposition failed to appreciate is that We were not fighting each other, but stood as the representatives of different political ideas, between which the people were to choose.”

The losing candidates have remained Zimbabweans and must promise to dedicate their parties “to every possible helpful effort to benefit the people of Zimbabwe. Having learnt from our past unproductive combative past Zimbabwe found itself and come up with a brilliant idea of putting together the the ideas of losing candidates in order to have peace and progress and for the love of Zimbabwe.

To that end through the shear brilliance of Cde Emerson MNANGAGWA POLAD was created. POLAD brings together politicians who contested the 2018 presidential elections (minus Chamisa by personal choice). These parties are brought together for national interest and their job is to advance productive developmental ideals in the best interest of ZIMBABWE.

President Emmerson Mnangagwa was seized with engaging Zimbabweans from across the board with a view to bringing about an inclusive economy for the country.

Chamisa refused to be part of POLAD, instead clamouring for a one-on-one interaction with President Mnangagwa. It was Chamisa who was fronting the narrative of a Government of National Unity. Chamisa suffers from a serious inferiority complex and thus compensates that by wanting to sideline any other opposition leader. When the MDC A led by Chamisa was finally Confronted by the overwhelming reality that their wishes will not come to pass, they then resorted to their party’s usual violence tactics.

It would be foolhardy for anyone to overlook the overwhelming fact that the involvement of the foreign hand was a glaring reality in this violent confrontation project.

Thanks to our army the price of peace was marked with blood. As always the fruits of freedom is watered by the blood of many.
The opposition has been agitating for a burning Zimbabwe, and the formation of POLAD angers them.

The opposition then started labelling all those who chose peace to be CIO agents.

“Rummaging through Chamisa’s incoherent address, one once again gets the overarching feeling that the beleaguered opposition leader was reading a script certainly not authored at his party offices.” Commented one journalist.
The supposedly ‘angry’ tone resonates well with several reckless statements and actions made and taken by certain Western ambassadors.

Not surprisingly, the irony of the Chamisa utterances were lost on both the opposition leader and his supporters who have yet, as numb minds would do, to publicly embrace the existence of illegal economic sanctions on the country.

If anything, their mandate is to see the return of whites on the controls of the economy.
Curiously, they have refused to be participants in the many empowerment programmes initiated by the ZANU PF-led Government.
Weird is the fact that they then do not find it odd to accuse ZANU PF of giving its supporters land and other resources that are now being manned by black people of this country. The insanity becomes laughable sometimes.

The attacks on ZANU PF for the cars given to POLAD members is laughable. To start with it was not ZANU OF which gave those people cars. They were given the cars by the government from a budget set aside for POLAD. POLAD is a combination of many political parties who are willing to see Zimbabwe moving on. This is the price of peace.

Financial and logistical Assistance to Opposition Parties is made available to assist opposition parties to carry out their parliamentary business so is the same hand extended to opposition parties who are carrying national duties outside parliament. Given the nature of opposition work in POLAD , financial and logistical help can be used for party political purposes and national purposes.

So buying these POLAD members cars was a noble thing done by Emmerson Mnangagwa .

This is the price of peace and development. In this context, Parliamentary and national business may be defined as: research associated with front bench duties, developing and communicating alternative policies to those of the Government of the day, and
shadowing the Government’s front bench.
It does not include political campaigning and similar partisan activities, political fundraising, membership campaigns or personal or private business of any kind.

The funding is for national duties even if they are done by those outside government but for the purpose of moving Zimbabwe forward.
What was done by the president in giving these cars to POLAD is something very simple but also very difficult: simple things often are.

It is an invitation to pay the price for peace. We all know that peace is an exceedingly high good. But for an exceedingly high good we should expect to have to pay an exceedingly high price. We must understand that the only force in human life that can generate enough energy to pay that price is tolerance.
POLAD in search of peace has abandoned the opposition’s grand Government confrontation plan

As a country Zimbabwe needs a more eloquent example of the stability of our constitutional system and the proud tradition of the Zimbabwean people of developing, respecting, and honoring institutions,” even when one loses. This is what POLAD stands for. So what is a car as compared to the peace they have delivered to Zimbabwe.

Chamisa and his party have always been sore losers. Chamisa and his party losing candidates haven’t always been gracious—or timely. They caused bloody riots in 2018 and we mark the third year of an attempt to disturb our peace.

In this new dispensation Zimbabwe expects the losing candidates and their parties to promise their help in achieving a growing and better Zimbabwe. POLAD also means that their Parties would remain “the parties of opposition when opposition is called for. They are not absorbed into ZANU PF. ZANU PF does not need them.

Even though the opposition always decry their loss as a result of corruption and fraud, if they can not prove it they must tell their supporters that they should be of good cheer and believe in Zimbabwean democracy. The Republic of Zimbabwe will live. The institutions of our fathers are not to expire in shame.

The sovereignty of the people of Zimbabwe shall be rescued from this peril and be re-established. We must have a responsible opposition.

Since it is not a formal part of the election process, there are no legal consequences if a presidential candidate such as Chamisa refuses to concede. As we will learn a concession isn’t a binding contract. And declining to concede doesn’t necessarily mean that an election will remain perpetually up in the air. If a candidate contests the results, there is a formal process with set deadlines that culminates in a certification of the official results.

It’s the notion that we are bound together by certain great principles and that our similarities are more binding than our differences are. So POLAD is the future unifying platform and spending on them is indeed the price of peace. Conventional wisdom holds that conflicts are bad for bourses. As a general rule, conflicts spook investors and spark stock market sell-offs, for the obvious reason that conflicts disrupts the normal rhythms of industry and commerce.
It is no accident that Zimbabwe’s economy struggled after elections and only picking up now. Conflicts can also cause commodity prices to go haywire as uncertainty rules. This is what Chamisa had always wanted for Zimbabwe. This is why he is so angered by the cars given to POLAD.

POLAD has taught us that we have to face our failure to create a peaceful nation. The country we have is one we have all created together, and it is a peaceful one. It costs us a great deal and we must admit that each one of us is implicated in having created this peace. As long as we cannot admit this we are very far from peace, because we remain in a country in which there are “us” and “them”: “Us” the good ones and “them” the ones who present the problem and obstacle to peace, the enemy. It makes no difference who “they” are – they can Madhuku’s Brian Mteki or the poet, Egypt Or Mwonzora whoever. But if we face the fact that we are one, that “they” are “us”, that the face of the enemy is our own face, then we will have reached the first basis for peace.

This looked hard until POLAD was established. So we have to think of something creative to bring home the fact that we are one. Once we see it is we who have failed to make peace and we who can make peace, we obviously then have to rise to our responsibility and do something. Imagine the whole country sticking their heads together and asking what we can do – the solution would not be very far away. That is what POLAD stands for.

While Chamisa and Biti and their puppet parrot Hopeless Chin’ono are huffing and puffing in front of the media, President Mnangagwa, true to nature and form, was putting in motion his plans to uplift the livelihoods of the majority.
President MNANGAGWA said

“The cornerstone of the Second Republic is dialogue as a means of resolving the challenges that may arise in our nation and the sharing of knowledge among us as Zimbabweans,” said President Mnangagwa.
“No one has the monopoly of ideas on how our country can speedily modernise, industrialise, develop and grow. It is only through dialogue and hard honest work that our collective efforts can be fruitful. As you may be aware, POLAD is a platform which seeks to enhance national cohesion, unity and political tolerance.

In addition, the forum is committed to undertake remedial steps to address identified gaps to enhance economic stability, growth and sustainable development
In that spirit, this summit presents us with an opportunity to put our minds together towards the realisation of our national vision and aspirations.”

“The economy is an intricate ecosystem that requires our collective effort and hard work. It influences our day to day lives regardless of our creeds, socio-economic status, political or religious persuasions, among other things. I therefore, call upon my fellow countrymen and women to join hands and help chart a better future for the collective good of our country.
In doing so, let us be realists and acknowledge that, to put our country back on its rails will not be an event, but a process.“

While Chamisa was huffing and puffing in front of the media, President Mnangagwa, true to nature and form, was putting in motion his plans to uplift the livelihoods of the majority. Let us hear the President speaking during the highly successful POLAD meeting:
“The cornerstone of the Second Republic is dialogue as a means of resolving the challenges that may arise in our nation and the sharing of knowledge among us as Zimbabweans,” said President Mnangagwa.
“No one has the monopoly of ideas on how our country can speedily modernise, industrialise, develop and grow. It is only through dialogue and hard honest work that our collective efforts can be fruitful. As you may be aware, POLAD is a platform which seeks to enhance national cohesion, unity and political tolerance.

In addition, the forum is committed to undertake remedial steps to address identified gaps to enhance economic stability, growth and sustainable development.

In that spirit, this summit presents us with an opportunity to put our minds together towards the realisation of our national vision and aspirations. We have, as a Government, declared 2020 as the year of productivity and trade; as such, let us work in unity of purpose to achieve our development milestones and ultimately, Vision 2030.

The economy is an intricate ecosystem that requires our collective effort and hard work. It influences our day to day lives regardless of our creeds, socio-economic status, political or religious persuasions, among other things. I therefore, call upon my fellow countrymen and women to join hands and help chart a better future for the collective good of our country.
In doing so, let us be realists and acknowledge that, to put our country back on its rails will not be an event, but a process.

There are no quick fixes. We must be bold and stay on course, always seeking sustainable means to resolve our challenges. Let us act and speak with the collective good in mind and never be blinded by individual or sectoral benefits.

In unity of purpose, let us provide proposals and recommendations that stimulate investment, productivity, decent jobs and fight poverty. Innovative ideas which will help Government to develop robust social safety nets for the more vulnerable members of our communities are also welcome.”

Let us not be blinded by individual or sectoral benefits.
In unity of purpose, let us provide proposals and recommendations that stimulate investment, productivity, decent jobs and fight poverty. Innovative ideas which will help Government to develop robust social safety nets for the more vulnerable members of our communities are also welcome.”

In that spirit we applaud the empowering of POLAD by the President off Zimbabwe. This is for the benefit of Zimbabwe and its people.

Vazet2900@yahoo.co.uk

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